Bali Traditional Instrument

Untitled-4-jegog.jpgJegog is a form of gamelan music indigenous to Bali, Indonesia played on instruments made of bamboo. The tradition of jegog is centered in Jembrana, a region in Western Bali. In recent years jegog has started to become popular in other regions of Bali with a few groups being established in central Bali to entertain tourists. International interest has been spread by tourists visiting Bali and by recordings. There are virtually no ensembles outside of Bali with the exception of at least two groups in Japan (Sekar Sakura and Geinoh Yamashirogumi, the latter’s having been used in 4 of the tracks in their score for the film Akira as well as on the final track of Ecophony Rinne ), one in the United States (Sekar Jaya) and one in Germany. Jegog music is very fast, loud, rhythmic and precise. Pieces last from a few minutes to as long as thirty minutes. Continue reading

The Center of Gamelan Craft in Bali

Untitled-5-gong.jpgTihingan Village in Banjarangkan sub district is the center of Gong gamelan production. Its production is start with crude work then expert work to synchronize the gong sound. This, the most important thing is the expertise to synchronize the gong sound. In Tihingan village there are 2 pande (expert) gong maker groups.This Village is location in Banjarangkan sub district and can be reached with 2 wheels or 4 wheels vehicles. About 3 km go to the west of Semarapura city. The road to Tihingan is well enough.

The word gamelan in the Balinese context is thought to originate from the word ‘magambel’ which means “to hit”. A gamelan instrument is often percussive with keyed xylophones or pot gongs made of a variety of materials, gongs of various sizes, double-headed drums and cymbals.
However, not all Balinese gamelan instruments are percussive. There are also wind, bowed, plucked and strummed instruments. Continue reading